Stepping into Intimidation (Life After College)

“We don’t stop going to school when we graduate.” ~ Carol Burnett

       It has almost been a full month since I graduated with my bachelors; however, it only feels as if I am just on winter break. Now that my roommate has gone back to school, reality is finally setting in; I am now an alumni of Fort Lewis College.  Alike many others who have already graduated, and many who have yet to feel this phenomenon, it gives me mixed emotions.

Continue reading “Stepping into Intimidation (Life After College)”

Surviving My Thoughts

I had a lot of time to sit and ponder about life yesterday. This was due to the fact I was stuck at the doctors office and hospital for a total of nine hours and my phone died during the first three.

I have always been fascinated to understand why people choose the majors they do. Whenever I ask people or see fellow classmates or students on campus, a series of questions run through my head. Did something significant happen in their life that could be related to a certain major and they wanted to pursue it because of that? Are they studying a certain major just because there are money benefits? Or were they expected to go into a concentration because it was a family trade?

Although this will always be a fascinating subject for me, I have found that I have now moved onto a different series of questions. (I think this is due to the fact I am nearing the end of my college career.) However, to get to those set of questions you have to sit and read how my day went yesterday…

Flashback to October 21, 2015
Where:  Mayagüez, Puerto Rico
When: 8:10AM

After waiting patiently at the doctors office for 15 minutes my name was called via intercom with a thick Puerto Rican accent. I told the doctor all of my problems and she sat patiently trying to understand my frantic English and occasional Spanish. She looked at me with caring eyes and told me very calmly where to go next, what to do, and what was going to happen. After I did everything I was required to do, including a lovely shot in the nalga (butt), I laid down in a bed to see if the pain would decrease. I was also “rewarded” with a heating pad to help with the pain. I must say resting in an AC room and a heating pad on your stomach is rather relaxing and every doctor office should offer this! After leisurely waiting an hour and a half for my shot to kick in, the doctor came back in to asses my issues. Because my condition did not better within time, they loaded me into a mini ambulance and took me to the nearest hospital. Even though it was entertaining to ride in the mini ambulance, it was rather unnecessary in my opinion.

I arrived at the hospital after a short drive. Because there were no rooms or people available I had to awkwardly wait on a stretcher in the middle of the ER for about 30 minutes. During this time I proceeded to people watch (my favorite hobby) and observe everybody who worked there to people who look like regulars at the ER or people who were very sick and obviously needed help. I finally got loaded into a tiny office where I had to explain all of my problems and my background information to somebody who could barely speak English. After about 15 minutes of struggling with the language barrier, I got transferred to a small area with curtains as walls and sick people as neighbors. I looked around and realized I was the only gringa there and that I was the only person who didn’t have somebody that had accompanied me. I continued to observe everybody for an hour until my doctor finally presented himself and proceeded to ask all the same questions the lady asked me an hour before. It took two more hours for a nurse to take my blood, give me medicine, and order me to pee in a cup. She then scurried off and let me marinate for another hour in my curtain room until I could get wheeled off for a few tests. It wasn’t until 5:00pm hit, that my feet touched the cement of the streets outside for the first time since the morning.

I guess long story short, I had a lot of time to people watch.

As somebody who is currently majoring in the health industry, the hospital is a very interesting place to be. I saw workers there who I could tell hated every moment, I saw others who loved their job, I even saw people who were neutral about it and looked like a robot. However, they all had something in common; they worked hard to earn their degree/degrees, they had to take boards and do all this with good grades. It made me happy when I saw the people who enjoyed their work, it gives me hope that I will find a job I enjoy just as much as they do. But, what about the people who were robots and looked like they were being tortured? These types of people make me confused, and make me doubt my college education at times. Why did they go through all that, just to hate their job? What happens if I don’t find a job in my field that I like? Will I even find a job? What if I got a degree all for nothing? What do I want to do with my life?

I know that this crisis will only worsen as graduation approaches. Specially since the only thing I want to do in life is travel the world (my wallet would convince you otherwise.) All I know is going to school, by the time I graduate I will have been in school for 16.5 years, it is rather likely I will have an identity crisis but who knows how small or big that will be. Don’t get me wrong I will enjoy not having to worry about tests and homework, but it will be different once I am completely finished and just have to worry about a job. However, do I even want to grow up? Can I just not grow up, work at a hostel or restaurant, and travel the world?

Thank you life!